Critical analyis of a rose for

By using an objective point of view an author turns the reader into a jury, so that the reader is able to interpret the story, and draw conclusions when given enough information.

a rose for emily literary analysis answers

He answered, "I feel sorry for Emily's tragedy; her tragedy was, she was an only child, an only daughter. Such a construction used by an artist who compared the short story to the lyric poem in its demands for exactness and economy, should lead us to suspect that the town may require as much of our attention as Emily.

Just before it, our pity for Emily and contempt for the town have reached their highest points.

a rose for emily literary analysis thesis

Page numbers appearing in the text are from this edition. Faulkner is a really worthy and famous writer that has a lot to say in his writings and I think that he accomplishes that when he writes.

The story is not easily optimistic however, for it is only after her death, when the hair is found on the indented pillow and all the damage has been irrevocably done, that anyone begins to understand how the town has apparently victimized Emily and how grandly she seems to have resisted victimization.

Homer disappears and the town is morally triumphant.

Critical analyis of a rose for

Balancing these disturbing elements is another set of facts and appearances. For example, the town believes Homer will marry Emily, but he deserts her. She had to kill him to keep him pp.

A rose for emily critical analysis

On the surface, the town defeats her, bending her to its will. We have no indication that a break with Homer is imminent when he disappears. Perhaps at this point she has become dear in another sense to the narrator and to us. The story is so constructed that we sympathize with Emily without understanding her, whereas the town, thinking it understands her, is shown to lack sympathy. Balancing these disturbing elements is another set of facts and appearances. In a interview with Jean Stein, Paris Review, 12 Spring , 30, Faulkner says that "the short story is the most demanding form after poetry. Another effect might be to emphasize both the speaker's distance from the events -- as he is able to re-order them -- and the town's lack of sympathetic understanding which he presumably shared when the events took place. In part three, she refuses, or perhaps fails, to play the part of Fallen Woman, when the town thinks she is fallen. Others suggest that our feelings should be mixed. How does this scene affect our feelings and knowledge about Emily? A goodly number of those pages of criticism deal with the well-known short story, "A Rose for Emily. She appears to treat both men as if they were not dead after they die.

The narrator appears also to be rather uncertain about Emily's true character. She does not want to acknowledge the fact that the world around her was changing therefore Miss Emily surrounds herself with death.

Beginning with section one, let us look closely at the text and our responses to it.

A rose for emily epiphany

Then, apparently, she suffers complete defeat. Faulkner belonged to a once-wealthy family of former plantation owners eNotes. The separation of cause and effect obscures the obvious pattern of events for us, very much as does the alteration of the chronology, thereby keeping our judgments about Emily in suspension and allowing the narrator to build sympathy for her before we can suspect what she may have done. Emily was an emotionless, fat, and lonely woman. I think the pity is in the human striving against its own nature, against its own conscience. The generations are similar in that they both choose to deal with an idea of Emily, rather than with Emily herself; they are different in that they have different ideas of her and, therefore, approach her and her taxes differently. We noted in our discussion of the first section that we felt pressure to sympathize with Emily as a victim of the town at her funeral and concerning her taxes, but we also felt ambiguously about her character upon first seeing her. Such a construction used by an artist who compared the short story to the lyric poem in its demands for exactness and economy, should lead us to suspect that the town may require as much of our attention as Emily. Even the final scene in the dusty bridal chamber may be as pathetic as it is gruesome. The final scene stubbornly refuses to resolve the conflicting responses that have been cultivated in the reader throughout the story. On the contrary, she seems to have been a pillar of the community. Though it is not really clear whether stereotyping is a cause or an effect of lack of sympathy, it seems rather clear that the problem with the categories is that they falsify their object, making sympathy difficult. On this question, also, there is little agreement. At her death, we are presented with the final tragedy.
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