Ap lit siren song essay

Ap lit the mystery poem

They gain pleasure from tricking the men that pass by. Odysseus is trying to return home to his finally and therefore, must escape the grasps of the perilous Sirens. The differing points of view and tones used to describe the Sirens show how the world views the Sirens and how the Sirens view the world. The poem is spoken with the pretense of blunt honesty, and the deception only appears in the last stanza, where it is revealed that the whole show of truth was in fact a farce to gain the confidence of the unwitting victim. They then appeal to him as their savior, begging him to help them, and after building that trust and affection from flattery of his intellect and overall attention, he feels motivated to comply. Tuesday, May 7, AP Practice Essay The Sirens are a classic figure in Greek mythology that serve as an obstacle in many a heroic journey, which illustrate the necessity of man to resist temptation. These separate tones and points of view allow for different understandings of the potency of the song, which alters the way the sirens are meant to be interpreted, despite their methods and mythology coming from the same place. One passage depicts terror; the other depicts a glorified game. The approach of the Sirens in the Odyssey is rather different from that of Atwood's, as the former are very obvious in their efforts, while the latter are more deceptive. After all, he assumes he will surely not be as naive as those before him. Atwood's Sirens use a similar tactic in attracting their subject. Posted by. The image is that of a boat rushing past the intoning creatures on the rocks, and the reader's perspective is that of someone on that boat, rowing ever faster and desperately trying to escape. The reader can see the intricacies that go into her speech and how exactly she allures the men because it is actually a Siren telling the story.

They lie directly to Odysseus, saying that it will be totally safe if he listens to them, as many other have before, and all have survived. He is solely concerned with escaping them and getting home. Odysseus takes the reader step by step how to resist the Sirens and stay alive.

The differing points of view and tones used to describe the Sirens show how the world views the Sirens and how the Sirens view the world.

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The poem, however, places the reader as the direct subject of the siren's song, thereby imitating more clearly how it that would be, and how easily a siren could manipulate anyone, as the readers find themselves so controlled. Margaret Atwood and Homer both describe the Sirens in their work but go about doing it in different ways.

They then appeal to him as their savior, begging him to help them, and after building that trust and affection from flattery of his intellect and overall attention, he feels motivated to comply.

They gain pleasure from tricking the men that pass by.

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The image is that of a boat rushing past the intoning creatures on the rocks, and the reader's perspective is that of someone on that boat, rowing ever faster and desperately trying to escape.

By referring to him in such a manner, they inflate his sense of self importance, which in turn garners a sort of trust. If they know how valuable and how persuasive a man he is, they surely will not try to trick him.

In the tale of Odysseus, the temptation comes from the mystical, hypnotic allure of their song and the wisdom that it promises.

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If they know how valuable and how persuasive a man he is, they surely will not try to trick him. She exemplifies exactly why no man can resist with her alluring speech. After all, he assumes he will surely not be as naive as those before him. By writing from two different points of view with differing tones, the authors give the audience a more dynamic understanding of the Sirens. One passage depicts terror; the other depicts a glorified game. They lie directly to Odysseus, saying that it will be totally safe if he listens to them, as many other have before, and all have survived. Odysseus, the metaphor for society, is scared of the Sirens and forced to hatch elaborate plans just to survive. The tones of the two pieces are also quite opposite. Tuesday, May 7, AP Practice Essay The Sirens are a classic figure in Greek mythology that serve as an obstacle in many a heroic journey, which illustrate the necessity of man to resist temptation. The tone is light because to the Sirens, taking in and destroying sailors is a game. Margaret Atwood and Homer both describe the Sirens in their work but go about doing it in different ways.

After all, he assumes he will surely not be as naive as those before him. They begin by telling him of all the failing men before him, effectively separating him from that group and developing a base level of trust.

No man can resist their song, and no man leaves alive once he is pulled in.

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Lee's AP Literature Blog: Practice AP essay (Sirens)